September 17, 2008

Dialogue, at Last?

MABB © ®

Yes, the government and the opposition have agreed on principles which will be conducive to some sort of dialogue. The talks are supposed to be based on various bases for dialogue, the reinstating of social peace and the starting of the dialogue process. Some of the topics to be touched are: the direct taxes to natural gas (IDH, for its Bolivian meaning), autonomy for the departments and their statutes, the new constitution, the nomination of various political posts (judges and authorities in the electoral court), and a revision to the voter registration list. The agreement also talks about involving international mediators such as the OAS, the EU, UN, UNASUR and the Catholic Church.

After reading the document and considering the way it is written, I am surprised the government accepted it as it is. It seems the government has compromised a lot and is willing to negotiate seriously. At least, that is how it looks on paper. I want to give the government the benefit of the doubt (based on prior behavior) and wait.

Meanwhile, for those who cannot have enough about Bolivia I post this link where you can see many videos of the recent events in Bolivia. The site is called LatAm Blog.

Enjoy!

6 comments:

democraticvoice.net said...

The problem is that the president and vice president didn't sign the agreement. Since it was ministers who are not in succession for the presidency it is not binding by international law.

kevin said...

Agree with 'democratic voice' - plus just after the Prefectos signed - it seems Evo had the military arrest the Governor of Pando under threat of being shot if he did not go... what type of dialouge is this? Then
Evo called for the dialouge to begin today, a day early "at 4 or 5 in CBBA" but as is the sorry case in Bolivia today... there where no flights available so no one went... 'es la vida en Bolivia'. Great dialouge - great country. What a flippin' mess.

mabb said...

Garcia was there and was leading the talks. Now, if he signed or not, I think is not important. The fact is, he showed the text (the result) of the talks and thus he said the government is behind it.

Besides, I think international law is the least thing in the minds of Bolivians now. :-)

And yes, both parties seek to gain strength and come to the table from a position where they have some power. No one likes to come to the negotiating table weak. So, I would expect that both parties seek to gain strength before.

mcentellas said...

I'm not sure the document constitutes a legally binding document in any way (either domestically or internationally). So, as MABB pointed out, the fact that Evo's government has publicly backed this as a framework for dialogue is what really matters. Discarding that agreement will only cost the government political capital (domestic & international).

GS said...

The problem is that the president and vice president didn't sign the agreement. Since it was ministers who are not in succession for the presidency it is not binding by international law

This is a significant stretch. It was an agreement negotiated by an international body recognized by the region's governments, to include Bolivia's. The agreement was signed by representatives of the Government and the Opposition. It doesn't have to be signed by the Prez or VP to be put into effect.

By this logic, the various Memorandums of Agreement or Memorandums of Understanding that underpin functional relations between all countries--and which are almost always signed by third and even fourth tier government officials--are not worth the paper their printed on.

Latamblog said...

Sí, ojala que se llegue a una solución dialogada para la paz en Bolivia. Gracias por la cita de nuestro Latamblog. Espero que sea de utilidad.
Ma. Luisa Álvarez de Toledo