September 12, 2007

Visa for Bolivian-Americans

MABB © ®

The Morales government will from December 1st. ask American citizens for entry visas to enter Bolivia. I am sure that the government has not thought about the Bolivians who are American citizens and who are the bulk of people who transit between the two countries.

The requirements will be:

  1. fill out the visa form with personal data and a color photo
  2. current passport, not expiring for at least six months
  3. police report
  4. proof of hotel reservation for the whole stay or
  5. a notarized letter of invitation by a Bolivian citizen who takes responsibility for the visitor
  6. immigration can interview this citizen before approving the visa
  7. round trip ticket
  8. yellow fever vaccination certificate
  9. proof of economic solvency (bank accounts or work letter, who knows)
  10. US$134
I am speechless. What can one say?

Update:
Of course, I am speechless, but Miguel at Pronto* is not. Got sei dank!

9 comments:

mcentellas said...

I didn't even think about how this would specifically affect Bolivian-Americans! But, yes, we're probably a large chunk of the "tourists" who visit Bolivia. On the plus side, this will encourage me to get my Bolivian citizenship re-instated (though I'd keep my US passport, of course!). In addition to avoiding these shenanigans, I could then also vote!

galloglass said...

Miguel: Knowing the leanings of this government, would you be able to reinstate it?

galloglass said...

Here are the countries in Group III along with the US. (I'm sure Iran will move to Group I in the next few days.)
AFGANISTÁN, EST. ISLAM. DE ASIA
CAMBOYA, ESTADO DE ASIA CONGO, REP. DEL ÁFRICA COREA, REP. POP. DEM. DE ASIA IRÁN, REP. ISLÁMICA DEL ASIA IRAQ, REP. DEL ASIA LAOS, REP. DEM. POPULAR ASIA LIBIA, REP. ARAB.SOC. Y POP. DE ÁFRICA
PAKISTÁN, REP. ISLAM ÁFRICA NIGERIA, REP. FED. DE ÁFRICA
SIRIA, REP. ÁRABE ASIA
SUDAN, REP. DE ÁFRICA

Anonymous said...

Obviously for Evo this is way to get even with the US requirements as far as visas go. I think this would hurt tremendously the insipid (although important) tourism industry in Bolivia.
I got a quick question, if you are Bolivian citizen but US naturalized citizen would you still need a visa to enter Bolivia?

miguel (mabb) said...

I am not sure we are even allowed to have US and Bolivian citizenship. There is no agreement between Bolivia and US for such a thing, is there?

Many people I know have both passports, but isn't it illegal to have two passports?

And, yes, if you became US citizen, presumably you swore loyalty to the US and thus you are given your American passport (very simply stated). If you travel, you use your passport and if your passport is American, then you have to apply for a visa to go to Bolivia. That is how I see it.

Bolivia Libre said...

Miguel,
I have friends with Bolivian and USA citizenship, yes, it is legal to have both nationalities in both countries, so fare.
When they travel to Bolivia, they us the Bolivian passport and when travel to US, they use their US passport, no problem so fare.
I do have a couple of friends that had their Bolivian passport expired becouse it was so difficult to get one, but I guess after the need to have a visa for Spain, that is not the case any more.

Aufbau Ost said...

Ask your wife, Miguel, whether or not this reminds her as much as it does me of the regulations the GDR had for West German visitors. I think they may have not been that much different.

miguel (mabb) said...

You are right Melli. In addition they asked visitors to exchange money. But the question was if the GDR did that in reciprocity or it had its own specific policy.

Bolivia is doing it purely for political reasons, I think.

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